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Dental health



Unfortunately, dental disease is still one of the most common health problems diagnosed among our pets.

During the month of August, the RSPCA will be promoting Pet Dental Month and how pet owners can take an active role in keeping their pet’s teeth and gums healthy. Here are some tips so you can take a more active role in your pet’s dental health.

1
A puppy’s teeth come in at about three to four weeks old. It has 28 temporary teeth and it will develop up to 42 permanent teeth as it grows into an adult dog. 
2 A kitten has 26 teeth, and an adult cat has 30 permanent teeth.
3
A horse’s teeth can be divided into two main categories; incisors at the front which tear grass and the premolars; and molars, which then grind the food down into a digestible size before swallowing.
4
A rabbit’s teeth are similar to horse’s teeth. They have evolved to break down tough, fibrous foods, such as grasses, weeds, twigs and leaves. To compensate for this constant wear, rabbit teeth are open-rooted, which means they continuously grow throughout their lives.
5
Oral disease in pets starts with a build up of bacteria that can cause plaque. As a bacterium grows in the plaque, the plaque turns to tartar.
6
An appropriate diet designed to remove plaque and tartar or to prevent the formation of tartar should be part of your pet’s dental health plan. 
7
Common signs of periodontal disease can include bad breath, painful mouth, difficulty eating or reduced appetite, teeth loss, pawing and rubbing of the mouth, bleeding gums, yellow or brown tartar build up on teeth and increased drooling or dribbling.
8
If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss and can cause damage to other organs, such as the heart, liver and kidneys, or lead to other serious health problems.
9
Broken teeth are a common problem among outdoor dogs. Aggressive chewing on hard objects is a primary cause of broken teeth in dogs.
10
All pets should have a regular dental check-up and teeth scaling if required.

Make a regular appointment with your local veterinarian or at RSPCA Vet Clinics to ensure your best friend keeps on smiling!

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RSPCA Veterinary Clinics
RSPCA Burwood East Vet Clinic
P
  03 9224 2222
E  Email enquiry

Location
3 Burwood Highway
Burwood East VIC 3151
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RSPCA Peninsula Vet Clinic
P  03 5978 9000

Location
1030 Robinsons Road
Pearcedale VIC 3912

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